` Richard the Lion Heart ‘

#AceHistoryNews – Richard I (September 8, 1157 – April 6, 1199) was King of England from 1189 to 1199. He was often referred to as Richard the Lionheart, Coeur de Lion. He was considered a hero in his day and has often been portrayed as one in works of literature.

Richard I the Lionheart, King of England

Richard I the Lionheart, King of England (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Early Life: 

The third of King Henry II‘s legitimate sons, Richard was never expected to accede to the throne.

He was, however, the favourite son of his mother, Eleanor of Aquitaine. Although born in Oxford, England, he soon came to know France as his home. When his parents effectively separated, he remained in Eleanor’s care, and was invested with her duchy of Aquitaine in 1168, and of Poitiers in 1172.

This was his consolation prize for the fact that his eldest brother, Henry the Young King, was simultaneously crowned as his father’s successor. Richard and his other brother, Geoffrey, duke of Brittany, thus learned how to defend their property while still teenagers.

As well as being an educated man, able to compose poetry in French and Provençal, Richard was also a magnificent physical specimen, his height is estimated at six feet four inches (1.93 m) tall, and gloried in military activity.

From an early age he appeared to have significant political and military abilities, became noted for his chivalry and courage, and soon was able to control the unruly nobles of his territory.

As with all the true-born sons of Henry II, Richard had limited respect for his father and lacked foresight and a sense of responsibility.

In 1170, his elder brother Henry the Young King was crowned king of England as Henry III. Historians know him as Henry “the Young King” so as not to confuse him with the later king of this name who was his nephew.

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History of Walter de Coutances

Coat of arms of Coutances (Normandy) drawn by ...

Coat of arms of Coutances (Normandy) drawn by Aroche for Blazon Project of French-speaking Wikipedia, with Inkscape. Source: own drawing – Blazon: unspecified (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

#AceHistoryNews – Snapshot of History

Walter de Coutances was a medieval Anglo-Norman Bishop of Lincoln and Archbishop of Rouen.

He began his royal service in the government of Henry II, serving as a vice-chancellor. He also accumulated a number of ecclesiastical offices, becoming successively canon of Rouen Cathedral (pictured), treasurer of Rouen, and Archdeacon of Oxford. King Henry sent him on a number of diplomatic missions, and finally rewarded him with the Bishopric of Lincoln in 1183. He did not remain there long, for he was translated to the archbishopric of Rouen in late 1184.

When Richard I, King Henry’s son, became king in 1189, Coutances absolved Richard for his rebellion against his father and invested him as Duke of Normandy. He then accompanied Richard to Sicily as the king began the Third Crusade, but events in England prompted Richard to send the archbishop back to England to mediate between William Longchamps, the justiciar whom Richard had left in charge of the kingdom, and Prince John, Richard’s younger brother. Coutances succeeded in securing a peace between Longchamps and John, but further actions by Longchamps led to the Justiciar’s expulsion from England. Coutances died in November 1207 and was buried in his cathedral.

Read more: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_de_Coutances>

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