Regency Era Lexicon – Crossing Our “T’s”

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Regency Era Lexicon – And Then There Was “T”

take orders – becoming a clergyman in the Church of England

A 1903 caricature of Robert McCall KC (formerly QC) wearing his court robes at the Bar of England and Wales. For court, he wears a short wig, and bands instead of lace at the collar, but he retains the silk gown and court tailcoat worn on ceremonial occasions. Public Domain. Leslie Ward - Published in Vanity Fair, 19 November 1903.  http://en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/Queen's_Counsel #/media/File:QC_Court_ robes_crop.jpg A 1903 caricature of Robert McCall KC (formerly QC) wearing his court robes at the Bar of England and Wales. For court, he wears a short wig, and bands instead of lace at the collar, but he retains the silk gown and court tailcoat worn on ceremonial occasions. Public Domain. Leslie Ward – Published in Vanity Fair, 19 November 1903. http://en.wikipedia.org/
wiki/Queen’s_Counsel
#/media/File:QC_Court_
robes_crop.jpg

take silks – a barrister would wear a silk gown once he became the King’s Counsel (or the Queen’s Counsel)

tallow – fat from oxen or sheep, which was used to make soap and candles

tambour – a hoop filled with material; used for embroidery work

tandem – a team of two horses harnessed one behind the other, rather than side by side

tanner – slang…

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